Cats! Cats! dog. Cats!

Just a girl and her cat spending too much time on the internet.

6 notes

I thought up an drawing project tonight and I’m really excited because I haven’t drawn anything with an idea or purpose behind it since high school…which is now almost a decade ago.

I will buy pens tomorrow.

Filed under art personal project

414,522 notes

mukuroikusaba:

don’t be too clingy
don’t be such a ‘girl’
be a woman
but be hairless like a child

don’t wear skimpy outfits
don’t be such a ‘slut’
be modest
but take it off when i ask

don’t assert yourself
don’t be such a ‘bitch’
be nice to me
but don’t be a fucking doormat

don’t be ignorant
don’t be such a ‘bimbo’
be intelligent
but don’t argue your opinion with me

don’t wear make-up ever
don’t be so ‘insecure’
be yourself
but don’t complain if i don’t like it

(via leukocytes)

14,585 notes

deuxencore:

feministdisney:

When someone says something like what Frog Naveen did, our first reaction is often to re-assert to them the ways in which we identify with what they accept as normal and “correct”:  "I’m straight, I shave, I’m thin, look at my face, I would be considered attractive by society’s standards.”
Instead of just this knee-jerk reaction, turn the spotlight back on the individual by asking why these things matter in the first place: Would feminism be less “valid” if the movement was completely comprised of queer, hairy, ugly girls?    Why do they encourage us to differentiate ourselves from our feminist sisters?  
Their assumptions that these identities are less worthy feminist voices, and that we would implicitly agree by choosing to distance ourselves from “the unideal feminist,” highlights the work feminism still needs to do.

THIS. FOREVER.

deuxencore:

feministdisney:

When someone says something like what Frog Naveen did, our first reaction is often to re-assert to them the ways in which we identify with what they accept as normal and “correct”:  "I’m straight, I shave, I’m thin, look at my face, I would be considered attractive by society’s standards.”

Instead of just this knee-jerk reaction, turn the spotlight back on the individual by asking why these things matter in the first place: Would feminism be less “valid” if the movement was completely comprised of queer, hairy, ugly girls?    Why do they encourage us to differentiate ourselves from our feminist sisters?  

Their assumptions that these identities are less worthy feminist voices, and that we would implicitly agree by choosing to distance ourselves from “the unideal feminist,” highlights the work feminism still needs to do.

THIS. FOREVER.

70,751 notes

To be white, or straight, or male, or middle class is to be simultaneously ubiquitious and invisible. You’re everywhere you look, you’re the standard against which everyone else is measured. You’re like water, like air. People will tell you they went to see a “woman doctor” or they will say they went to see “the doctor.” People will tell you they have a “gay colleague” or they’ll tell you about a colleague. A white person will be happy to tell you about a “Black friend,” but when that same person simply mentions a “friend,” everyone will assume the person is white. Any college course that doesn’t have the word “woman” or “gay” or “minority” in its title is a course about men, heterosexuals, and white people. But we call those courses “literature,” “history” or “political science.”

This invisibility is political.

Michael S. Kimmel, in the introduction to the book, “Privilege: A Reader” (via thinkspeakstress)

(via deuxencore)