Cats! Cats! dog. Cats!

Just a girl and her cat spending too much time on the internet.

333,142 notes

lacigreen:

swayzepatrick:

fabootheenigma:

grodus:

i like this one

For a second I was expecting something different and was really enraged

fucking bless whoever made this

you hear this whole “not like the other girls” thing espoused by young women and reiterated in romantic comedies over and over.  it’s the idea that she’s a “real girl” who’s “different” because she’s NOT giggly, concerned with her appearance, anti-intellectual, obsessed with boys, vapid, etc.  
it’s no wonder girls end up feeling like they’re different from “other girls”.  women aren’t stereotypes, we’re human beings. 

lacigreen:

swayzepatrick:

fabootheenigma:

grodus:

i like this one

For a second I was expecting something different and was really enraged

fucking bless whoever made this

you hear this whole “not like the other girls” thing espoused by young women and reiterated in romantic comedies over and over.  it’s the idea that she’s a “real girl” who’s “different” because she’s NOT giggly, concerned with her appearance, anti-intellectual, obsessed with boys, vapid, etc.  

it’s no wonder girls end up feeling like they’re different from “other girls”.  women aren’t stereotypes, we’re human beings. 

(Source: zhaid)

Filed under this is nice

24,690 notes

Indeed, the idea of ‘winning the girl’ – of overcoming female objections or resistance through repeated and frequently escalating efforts – is central to most of our modern romantic narratives. (Female persistence, by contrast, is viewed as pathetic.) And the more I think about instances of creepiness, harassment and stalking that culminate in either the threat or actuality of sexual assault, the more I’m convinced that a massive part of the problem is this socially sanctioned idea that men are fundamentally entitled to persist. Because if men are meant to persist, then women who say no must only be rejecting the attempt, not the man himself, so that every separate attempt becomes one of a potentially infinite number of keys which might just fit the lock of the woman’s approval. She’s not the one who’s allowed to say no, not really; she should be silent and passive as a locked door, waiting patiently while the man runs through however many keys he can be bothered trying. And if he gets sick of this lengthy process and just breaks in? Well, frustration under those circumstances is only natural. Either the door shouldn’t have been there to impede him, or it shouldn’t have been locked.
The Creepiness Question (via notemily)

(via naamahdarling)

20,136 notes

Not queer like gay. queer like, escaping definition. Queer like some sort of fluidity and limitlessness at once. Queer like a freedom too strange to be conquered. Queer like the fearlessness to imagine what love can look like… and pursue it.
Brandon Wint (via un-gendered)

(Source: etiquette-etc, via deuxencore)

33,694 notes

So here’s the real reason that rape jokes are troubled territory -

Because rape victims say so.

They get to say that. They get to feel that way. On this, they get to set the cultural rules.

It’s not about right or wrong, or logic versus emotion, or arguments of over sensitivity or hypocrisy - you have the free speech to make whatever jokes you want or talk about rape in whatever way you feel is illuminating. But they get to be upset about it. And call you on it. And be hurt by it.

But consider this:

You get to not be a rape victim.

They, however, are not afforded that luxury. Ever again.

Chuck Wendig (via vickiexz)

(via naamahdarling)